From Pine View Farm

Enforcers category archive

Immunity Impunity 0

See the report from The Hill that Farron refers to.

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The Sticking Together Point 0

At Psychology Today Blogs, Arthur Dobrin explores why good cops, who are sworn to uphold the law and do, protect bad cops, who are sworn to uphold the law and don’t.

It is an especially timely read.

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Tales of the Trumpling: Snapshots of Trickle-Down Trumpery 0

Watch for the Trumpling.

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Presumption 0

Police pummel passenger for being in a “ride share” with a broken tail light.

It is difficult for citizens to respect law enforcers when the law enforcers do not respect either citizens or the law. Just sayin’.

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It’s All about the Algorithm, Self-Fulfilling Prophecies Dept. 0

The EFF reports that Santa Clara, California, has ended its near-decade long experiment with “predictive policing” after finding that it just does not deliver. Here’s a tiny bit from their article (emphasis added):

The technology attempts to function similarly while conducting the less prevalent “person based” predictive policing. This takes the form of opaque rating systems that assign people a risk value based on a number of data streams including age, suspected gang affiliation, and the number of times a person has been a victim as well as an alleged perpetrator of a crime. The accumulated total of this data could result in someone being placed on a “hot list”, as happened to over 1,000 people in Chicago who were placed on one such “Strategic Subject List.” As when specific locations are targeted, this technology cannot actually predict crime—and in an attempt to do so, it may expose people to targeted police harassment or surveillance without any actual proof that a crime will be committed.

There is a reason why the use of predictive policing continues to expand despite its dubious foundations: it makes money. Many companies have developed tools for data-driven policing; some of the biggest arePredPol, HunchLab, CivicScape, and Palantir. Academic institutions have also developed predictive policing technologies, such as Rutgers University’s RTM Diagnostics or Carnegie Mellon University’s CrimeScan, which is used in Pittsburgh. . . .

It is almost serendipitous, in a darkly sardonic way, that, in the same week that the EFF released its report, the Tampa Bay Times published the results of its investigation into how predictive policing lead to a cesspool of police surveillance and harassment in Pasco County, Florida. A nugget (again, emphasis added):

First the Sheriff’s Office generates lists of people it considers likely to break the law, based on arrest histories, unspecified intelligence and arbitrary decisions by police analysts.

Then it sends deputies to find and interrogate anyone whose name appears, often without probable cause, a search warrant or evidence of a specific crime.

They swarm homes in the middle of the night, waking families and embarrassing people in front of their neighbors. They write tickets for missing mailbox numbers and overgrown grass, saddling residents with court dates and fines. They come again and again, making arrests for any reason they can.

One former deputy described the directive like this: “Make their lives miserable until they move or sue.”

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If One Standard Is Good, Two Must Be Better 0

Robin Abcarian looks at the mental contortions that (mostly white) persons put themselves through to deny reality sitting right before their eyes to justify unjustifiable police shootings of black persons, mostly young men.

Get out of Jail free cardBut step back for a moment. Think of the bigger picture.

And look at it this way: No one should have put a knee on Floyd’s neck in the first place. No one should have shot Blake in the back. No one should have barged into Taylor’s home unannounced.

And, by the way, how is it OK for a 17-year-old white kid to freely roam the streets of Kenosha with an AR-15-style rifle — that he later uses to kill two people while police look on — but a Black man with a knife in his car is considered a threat to a cop standing behind him?

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Disparate Dockets 0

Teacher leading Civics calls point to blackboard headed,

Click for the original image.

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Facebook Frolics 0

It was just a(nother) mistake.

And, in more news of frolickers . . . .

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“One Rule for Me, One Rule for Thee” 0

What Noz said.

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Prepared 0

School children hiding under desks during

Via The Bob Cesca Show Blog.

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A Question of Collusion 0

PoliticalProf considers the killings in Kenosha.

Just read it.

(Also read the two preceding posts.)

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American Police, Origins Issue 0

Automatic pistol with the words

Via Job’s Anger.

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Facebook Frolics 0

A badge-wearing frolicker.

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Immunity Impunity 0

My local rag investigates how the “bad apples” manage to stay in the barrel. A snippet:

As legislators plan to address systemic policing problems in a special session next week, a Virginian-Pilot investigation found three dozen officers convicted of crimes since 2011 who were never decertified. It’s unclear if any are still working as police.

State law makes it impossible to strip an officer of their certification unless they have been convicted of a felony or certain misdemeanors. And even when officers’ conduct reaches those narrow criteria, many are not decertified by the state board with that responsibility.

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Facebook Frolics 0

Enforcer frolics.

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Immunity Impunity, Driving while Black Dept. 0

There’s a reason different states’ license plates have different color schemes.

Plus, in my experience, automobiles are generally somewhat larger than motorcycles (emphasis added).

Aurora police apologized after a group of Black girls were detained and at least two handcuffed during a weekend investigation of a stolen car. Officers later determined that the vehicle they were seeking had the same license plate number but was from out of state.

(snip)

Police then determined they had stopped the wrong car. It had Colorado license plates but a motorcycle with the same license plate number from Montana was the vehicle that had been reported as stolen on Sunday.

More at the link.

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Trumpled Protests 0

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Immunity Impunity 0

Protestor holding an

Click for the original image.

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Tales from the Front 0

A caller tells Thom of her experiences at the demonstrations in Portland, Oregon. (It should come as no surprise that her story differs from the picture painted by Attorney-General Lowering the Barr.)

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Still Rising Again after All Those Years 0

Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton don’t cotton to no truth tellin’ about dem ole cotton fields back home.

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