From Pine View Farm

The Secesh category archive

Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

AL.com’s Cameron Smith explores the lie that will not die, the myth of the noble “lost cause.” Here’s a bit; follow the link for the rest.

After the Civil War, the Union had accomplished its objective. Yet the South struggled to let go of the “holy’’ war it had spawned. The delusions of righteous grandeur explain why “Lost Cause” mythology and romanticized notions of the Antebellum South live on. They’re far less painful than tracing our lineage to those who were either deceived into or directly waged an unnecessary war to maintain an atrocious institution.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Jean Guerrero rips the hood off those who claim to be “colorblind” as they campaign against affirmative action. Here’s a tiny bit from the article (emphasis added):

The Republican activists leading a decades-long assault on affirmative action, which is poised to succeed in the Supreme Court, claim they want to eliminate racism and create a colorblind society.

(snip)

But those same activists who’ve stoked the flames of antagonism toward affirmative action have close ties to the architects of this country’s metastasizing white nationalist movement. These links reveal the activists’ ultimate agenda, which has nothing to do with ending racism.

Follow the link for the evidence.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Sometimes they can’t seem to stop themselves.

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Courting Disaster 2

Sam and his crew discuss the latest antics of the Supremacist Supreme Court and their inimical implications.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Helen Ubinas is less than sanguine. She argues that

We are a nation rotting from within because of our failure to fully and adequately address issues of racial justice. And with so many people trying to ignore — or erase — our ugly past, we are hastening our demise by sidestepping our shameless present.

Follow the link for her reasoning.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

At my local rag, Margaret Edds discusses Virginia Governor Trumpkin’s apparent reluctance to allow schools to teach history that actually happened. Here’s a tiny bit of her article:

Still unfulfilled, however, is Youngkin’s history pledge. With a once-in-seven-years review of Virginia history standards due for completion in November, an opening has arrived. Yet, the recent decision by a Board of Education flush with new Youngkin appointees to delay public hearings on draft standards raises alarm. So does the Youngkins’ dropping from tours of the governor’s mansion — at least for now — a deeply researched narrative about the enslaved people who once lived and worked there.

Such developments must not signal a retreat from a long-overdue, more truthful telling of Virginia history.

Afterthought:

She says “they must not,” but I got a dollar to a doughnut that they do, at least as long as the party of the New Secesh holds power.

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If at First You Don’t Secede, Try, Try Again 0

Jesus, Mary, and Joseph.

Aside:

I agree with Farron that these persons are, indeed, bonkers.

They are also dangerous.

Where is HUAC when we need them? Because it doesn’t get much more unAmerican than this.

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He Wore the Grey 0

Warning: Short promo at the end.

I had ancestors who wore the grey.

They were wrong then, and those who would emulate them are wrong now.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Will Bunch opines that Pennsylvania’s Republican gubernatorial candidate seems to one of those risers again.

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Closing Books, Closing Minds 0

At the Roanoke Times, Arnold Schuetz, who grew up and attended school in Germany shortly after the end of World War II, sees echoes of his own experience in current attempts to–you will pardon the expression–whitewash America’s history of chattel slavery and racial discrimination.

No excerpt or summary will do his article justice. Just read it.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

At AL.com, Roy S. Johnson explains the difference between an error and a mistake.

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Facebook Frolics 0

Inadvertently truthful frolics.

Aside:

They just can’t help telling us who they are, can they?

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What’s in a Name? 0

Actually, quite a bit.

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One Nation, Divisible 0

Farron comments on a disturbing trend in Republican (what passes for) discourse.

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History Is What Happened 0

It is not what persons want to believe happened.

As long as white Americans continue to willfully blind themselves to the facts of America’s original sin of chattel slavery, America will (continue to) live a lie and be vulnerable to that lie.

And I say that as a white guy who numbers among his ancestors persons who held slaves, as the saying went, including the man who signed John Brown’s death warrant at Harper’s Ferry.

That was not me and I am not them.

___________________

I’ve mentioned before how Second Son brought that home to me when we visited Harper’s Ferry and saw a wax figure of said ancestor, signing said death warrant, in a display there. Second Son said, “So, he was on the wrong side.”

And he was.

I already knew that, but, as I said, that comment brought it home.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Michael Paul Williams is less than impressed with Virginia’s Governor Trumpkin’s appointees. Here’s what he has to say about one of them (emphasis added):

Now comes Richmond-area historian Ann McLean, his appointee to the Virginia Board of Historic Resources and an apparent magna cum laude graduate of the Jubal Early School of Lost Cause Revisionism.

Our moment of racial reckoning, teetering on the brink, does not need a Confederate apologist. But here comes McLean, who likened Abraham Lincoln’s attempt to preserve the Union to “Russia invading Ukraine” during a July 18 interview on John Reid’s talk show on WRVA radio. She also claimed that “slavery would have been outlawed in the South within five or 10 years, but they wanted to do it on their own time.”

I can only assume that “they” were not considering the desired timetable of the enslaved.

Follow the link for the others in his list.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Words fail me.

The University of Central Florida has removed anti-racist statements from departmental websites, a move that one professor has decried as an “infringement on academic freedom” in the wake of the passage of a Republican-backed law that restricts how race can be taught.

Much more at the link.

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Whitewashing History 0

Georgia is among the states that have outlawed teaching truthful American history. At the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Maureen Downey writes of the dilemma that teachers face now that said law has gone into effect in Georgia. A snippet:

Georgia teachers return to K-12 classrooms next month restrained by a new state law that mandates avoidance of divisive concepts that cause students “discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological distress because of his or her race.”

Never mind that there are many chapters of U.S. history that should cause anguish — the 1864 Sand Creek Massacre where Colorado cavalrymen slaughtered Native American women and children, the 1896 U.S. Supreme Court Plessy v. Ferguson decision that legalized “separate but equal,” the 1906 Atlanta race riot where 5,000 rampaging white men and boys murdered at least 25 Black Atlantans going about their daily lives and destroyed hundreds of homes and businesses, and the forced relocation and incarceration of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry during World War II.

Under the new divisive concepts law, a Georgia parent could complain that a teacher’s comments during a discussion of the Atlanta race riot crossed into what the bill defines as “‘race scapegoating, assigning fault or blame to a race.” Such a complaint could land the school system in front of the state Board of Education facing sanctions.

Follow the link for a discussion of possible strategies that teachers can use to avoid falling prey to the proponents of prevarication about the past.

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Denial Is Not Just a River in Egypt 0

It’s also a law in Florida.

Afterthought:

Denying history means never learning its lessons.

In this case, it is quite clear that those who would deny history also reject its lessons, because they are too busy still rising again after all these years.

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Whitewash 0

Speaking of the Republicans’ war against truth in learning . . . .

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