From Pine View Farm

The Secesh category archive

Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

At The Roanoke Times, Betsy Biesenbach pens an eloquent rebuke to those who profess that flying the Stars and Bars is “about heritage, not hate”; she notes that symbols cannot be detached from what they symbolize.

A snippet; follow the link for the rest:

. . . when I read in the Jan. 14 edition of the Roanoke Times that in revising their dress code, the Franklin County school board refused to ban the wearing of confederate flags, I was not surprised. The people supporting the ban merely asked that their feelings be respected — that those who take pleasure in displaying the flag not do so at their expense. But the response from a person who opposed the ban was literally: “just get over it.” If this person was referring to the legacy of slavery in this country — which still affects us all — it’s not something any of us are ready to just “get over.”

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Kyle Whitfield looks at an Alabama candidate’s recent campaign ad and concludes that some things never change.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Rolling back the clock to 1953.

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Shea’s Rebellion 0

Strange doings in the State of Washington harkening back to Ammon Bundy’s occupation of a national wildlife refuge three years ago. Here’s just a bit from the story; follow the link for the rest.

Just minutes after the release of an investigative report that accuses Washington state Rep. Matt Shea of engaging in domestic terrorism, his Republican House colleagues Thursday stripped his name and face from their website, moved his office and suspended him from their caucus.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

The Rude One dismembers Nikki Haley’s defense of the Stars and Bars. (Warning: Language, all of it warranted.)

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Celebrating a white Christmas, the Alabama way: Kyle Whitmire of AL.com comments.

Here’s a bit:

For years, the city’s tree has stood at the intersection of Park Place and 20th Street, where for a month each year it has blocked pedestrians’ and motorists’ view of the Confederate monument in Linn Park.

Now the Alabama Supreme Court says obscuring that monument is illegal.

Follow the link for much, much more.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

The Secesh win one. A snippet:

Alabama’s Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that the city of Birmingham broke state law when it ordered plywood screens be placed around the base of a Confederate monument in 2017.

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Statues of Limitations 0

In The American Scholar, Robin Kirk, who served on a committee about Confederate monuments for the city of Durham, North Carolina, considers the import and future of those monuments to treason. Here’s a tiny little bit, in which he discusses the toppling of the statue that led to that committee (emphasis added):

Many residents, especially newcomers, had barely noticed the statue or understood what it symbolized. But for black Durham, the silent sentinel had been a constant reminder of the injustices of slavery and Jim Crow.

I commend the article to your attention. It’s a long read, but a worth-while one.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

At Psychology Today Blogs, Thomas Hills looks at the impeachment inquiry and partisanship and the factors that are contributing to the latter.

Here’s a snippet (emphasis added); follow the link for the rest. It is worth your while.

The psychological research on interpersonal conflict shows that when grievances arise, each side tends to bias the evidence in ways that support their own position. A study by Baumeister and colleagues found that perpetrators and victims basically build dual worlds of facts to justify their opposing positions. Victims see violence towards them as arbitrary and gratuitous and often coming in a long series of injustices. Perpetrators, on the other hand, feel their actions are provoked, justified, and one-off events effectively designed to “correct” imbalances.

The implication may be that no one has objective access to the truth and all sides are equally wrong. However, that is the wrong take-home message.

The “there is no truth” argument is of course exactly what the guilty side of any argument would like you to believe. . . .

Elsewhere in the article, he argues that the roots of this political conflict go back to the Vietnamese War.

I think he’s right about the roots being in a war, but he missed the war by about 100 years.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

The SPLC has the emails demonstrating Stephen Miller’s bigotry.

Just read ’em.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

The Charlotte Observer reports on racists who mail it in.

Be sure to watch the video, even if you don’t read the whole article.

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Tales of the Trumpling: Snapshots of Trickle-Down Trumpery 0

A Trumpled campaign.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

At The American Scholar, Elizabeth D. Samet takes a deep look at the history and meaning of the South’s Confederate monuments and the recent raising of a monument to Ulysses S. Grant at West Point. An excerpt:

The late-19th-century national reconciliation movement—of which Grant’s own coffin, accompanied by two federal and two Confederate pallbearers, proved a potent symbol—continues to shape the way many Americans understand the Civil War today. Grant did not share this understanding. Declaring in his Personal Memoirs that slavery was the cause of the war, he also judged that cause “one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse.”

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Secesh sues history.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Facing South takes a deep dive into North Carolina’s gerrymandering and, in particular, how it has affected judicial elections. It seems that North Carolina Republicans have decided that, if you can’t win ’em, gerrymander ’em.

An excerpt:

North Carolina legislators’ desire to change the courts and judicial elections coincided with their repeated losses in voting rights cases, including lawsuits over gerrymandering at all levels of government. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld rulings that North Carolina’s election districts for both Congress and the state legislature were racially gerrymandered.

The effort to redraw judicial election districts began in the spring of 2017, when (Former state Rep. Justin–ed.) Burr introduced a plan to quickly redraw districts for judges and prosecutors around the state. An early map would have placed more than half of the state’s black district court judges in a district with another incumbent, according to NC Policy Watch.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

I fear that Alby may have a point.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Thom reflects on the return of overt racism to public discourse and muses as to what extent “social” media has contributed to it.

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Tales of the Trumpling: Snapshots of Trickle-Down Trumpery 0

A stars and bars Trumpling.

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