From Pine View Farm

Mammon category archive

Cashing in the Schools: The Privatization Scam 0

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All the News that Fits 0

Thom wonders whether media corporations’ quest for profit is affecting their news coverage, in particular in choosing which stories to cover and which to ignore (or, at least, to de-emphasize).

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Fly the Fiendly Skies 0

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Fly the Fiendly Skies 0

Scrooge would be proud.

US-based Frontier Airlines has started asking passengers to tip their cabin crew after they bring refreshments around the plane.

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How Far Will Wells Fargo 0

One more time, pretty damned far.

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Follow the Money 0

Trump’s political appointees will get raises as federal employees furloughed during the Trump shutdown suffer.

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Hoist on the Elmer Gantry 0

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Extraction Reaction 0

Title:  Coal Poll.  Question:  Do you favor regulation of coal?  People with coal say

Via Job’s Anger.

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Carrion Crows 2

Peter Whoriskey explains the hedge fund buy-out con and how it stiffs honest working persons. A snippet:

“It was a long, slow decline,” said Amy Gerken, formerly an assistant office manager at one of the stores. Sun Capital Partners, the private-equity firm that owned Marsh, “didn’t really know how grocery stores work. We’d joke about them being on a yacht without even knowing what a UPC code is. But they didn’t treat employees right, and since the bankruptcy, everyone is out for their blood.”

The anger arises because although the sell-off allowed Sun Capital and its investors to recover their money and then some, the company entered bankruptcy leaving unpaid more than $80 million in debts to workers’ severance and pensions.

For Sun Capital, this process of buying companies, seeking profits and leaving pensions unpaid is a familiar one. Over the past 10 years, it has taken five companies into bankruptcy while leaving behind debts of about $280 million owed to employee pensions.

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Wading into the Blackwater 0

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Facebook Frolics 0

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

Facebook is the Wells Fargo of “social” media.

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The Secret Ingredient 0

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Punk’d in the Pocketbook 0

You may have heard about the Payless Shoe chain’s “Palessi” prank, in which Payless invented a tony ersatz brand, “Paylessi,” and gulled folks with more money than sense into paying hundreds of dollars for $20 shoes.

At Psychology Today Blogs, Utpal Dholakia draws three lessons from this. Here they are; follow the link for a detailed discussion of the Paylessi prank and of each of these items.

  • We should be skeptical of recommendations given by influencers and so-called experts.
  • We should treat brands like wrapping paper on a Christmas present, not the present itself.
  • When making a purchase decision, we should pay attention to the product features that really matter.

Read more »

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Facebook Frolics 0

Woman in living room on phone:  Hello, police?  I'd like to report a peeping Tom outside my house and spying on me and I'm afraid he's going to . . . never mind, it's only Mark Zuckerberg.

Click for the original image.

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How Far Will Wells Fargo? 0

One more time, pretty damned far.

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Facebook Frolics: A Christmas Frolic 0

Santa Claus to child on his knee:  You don't have to tell me what you want for Christmas.  I already bought that information from Facebook.

Via Job’s Anger.

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Know Them by the Company They Keep 0

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Taking a Powder 0

Transcript here.

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Goldman’s Sacks, Mnuchin Minutiae Dept. 0

Thom and David Dayen discuss the career of Treasury secretary Mnuchin, aka “The Foreclosure King,” who Dayen describes as “the fox that is guarding the hen house.”

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Rounding Up the Research 0

Learn more here.

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