From Pine View Farm

Republican Lies category archive

The Voter Fraud Fraud, in Pictures 0

Title:  A Taxing Day at the Polls.  Frame One:  Old black lady approaches the poll officials and says,

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The Voter Fraud Fraud 0

Jay Bookman reports on the latest from Georgia Republicans’ gut-out-the-vote efforts.

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Indoctrinotion 0

A Philadelphia school teacher calls out a Republican for accusing him on “indoctrinating” his students. A snippet:

Two weeks ago, this paper reported that Val DiGiorgio, chairman of the Pennsylvania Republican Party, accused me, a civics teacher at Central High School, of distributing partisan campaign flyers to my students during school hours. He personally called Superintendent Hite, ensuring that I would be muzzled while the school investigated this claim. DiGiorgio repeated this claim on talk radio, claiming that Philadelphia teachers were using our positions for “liberal indoctrination” of public-school students. The story was soon picked up by Breitbart Media, where readers across the country called for my firing — or worse, violence against my students and me.

And it was all untrue.

Follow the link for the rest of the story.

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Both Sides Not 0

The Rude One points out that one thing is not like the other thing.

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The Lies of the Land 0

Tony Norman.

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Kavanaugh’s Cavalcade of Cozenage 0

The Boston Globe corrals Brett Kavanaugh’s flock of duplicity. Here’s some samples; follow the link for the list and the papers conclusion.

  • Kavanaugh was asked if he was involved with a scheme to steal Democratic staff e-mails related to judicial confirmations. He lied about it. E-mails showed that he was involved.
  • In 2006, Kavanaugh was asked if he was involved in the controversial nomination of federal Judge Charles Pickering. He lied about that too and said he was not.
  • In 2006, Kavanaugh was asked about his role in the nomination of William Haynes, the Pentagon general counsel involved in creating the Bush administration’s interrogation policies. He lied about that.

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Gamers 0

Roy Eidelson explores the mind games that the right-wing deploys to further their agenda and how they are being used to protect the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh. Here’s a bit about one of them:

Superiority. “Pursuing a Higher Purpose.” They insist that tainted actions—such as the torture of war-on-terror prisoners—must be evaluated within the context of the greater good and America’s enduring exceptionalism.

Follow the link for the complete list with more detail.

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The Voter Fraud Fraud 0

Thom and Greg Palast discuss recent events in the Republican gut-out-the-vote effort.

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Storm Prep 0

Donald Trump boarding up the White House.  Written on the boards is

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A Trumpled Party 0

Dana Milbank looks at Republicans’ early campaign tactics for this fall’s election and concludes that they intend to use ad hominem character assassination, lies, innuendo, falsified photos, and the like as their first choice of tactics (follow the link for his list of numerous examples).

He suggests that the Trumpling of the Republican Party is complete. A snippet (emphasis added):

No longer just the party of Donald Trump, Republicans sound like they are Donald Trump. And their strategy amounts to an extraordinary acknowledgment of failure: After two years of undivided control of Congress and the White House, and eight years of GOP legislative majorities, Republicans cannot come up with a single policy achievement – on taxes, health care, regulations or anything else – that they believe will resonate with voters.

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The Voter Fraud Fraud 0

What’s in a name?

Well, not very much, it seems.

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The Birth of a Notion 0

Frame One:  EPA Director watches Rudy Guiliani declare,

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Immunity Impunity 0

Black couple reading newspaper with headlines,

Via Job’s Anger.

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Pervasive Perfidy 0

Sarah Huckabee Sanders answers a question about Trump's use of the n-word, saying,

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All the News that Throws a Fit 0

Display window of electronics store.  Donald Trump saying,

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How Stuff Works, Gut Out the Vote Dept. 0

Thom and Greg Palast discuss the mechanics of voter suppression, focusing primarily on Florida and Kansas.

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The Voter Fraud Fraud 0

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Stimulus–>Response 0

Robert Epstein, former Editor-in-Chief at Psychology Today among many other accomplishments, offers a construct for understanding why Donald Trump does and says what he does and says. The concept is “sympathetic audience control”; it does not refer to the individual’s controlling the audience, but rather to the audience’s affecting the individual.

Everyone, of course, is affected by this to some degree. We behave differently at the in-laws than at the neighborhood watering hole, differently in church than at a party or in a business meeting.

Epstein suggests that Trump manifests an extreme version of sympathetic audience control.

I find this completely consistent with Trump’s behavior as observed and reported daily; follow the link to determine whether or not you find his argument persuasive.

Here’s a bit (emphasis added):

Sympathetic audience control and a small time window produce most of the odd cognitive glitches. Moment to moment, Trump either sees a foe and shoots, or he sees a friend and is influenced. In that kind of perceptual world, Trump inevitably shifts his views frequently and has no trouble denying what he said yesterday. All that’s real to him is what friends or foes are saying inside those small time windows. All else is fuzzy, and that’s why he can so easily tell so many lies. From his perspective, lying has no meaning. Only reacting has meaning. Trump reacts.

Aside:

In a similar vein, Dick Polman mourns the death of truth.

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A Spicy Publication 0

Farron is not impressed with Sean Spicer’s new book. (Unfortunately for Farron, he makes an egregious error in his rant. Can you spot it?)

(Typo fixed.)

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Bale Out 0

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