From Pine View Farm

Hate Sells category archive

Two Different Things 0

Selfishness ≠ Liberty

Women wearing

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The back story.

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Twits on Twitter 0

Twits who celebrate cruelty.

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Facebook Frolics 0

Woman standing on front step says to pollster:  I used to vote my conscience, but Facebook convinced me . . . .

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“But There’s No Other Possible Explanation” 0

New York University’s Social Justice Lab explores why persons who lean right politically are more susceptible to conspiratorial thinking than those who lean left. Here’s a bit, in which University of Cambridge (UK) professor Professor Sander van der Linden responds to a question:

Sander: “It is important to clarify that my position is not that liberals are somehow impervious to conspiracy theories. What I am saying is that the extent and magnitude of endorsement is strongly asymmetric so that extreme conservatives tend to be much more conspiratorial in their reasoning than extreme liberals. This is explained, at least in part, by growing distrust amongst conservatives which dates back to a long history of paranoia in the U.S. political system about other groups. I think this nuance often gets lost when people say ‘both liberals and conservatives have political biases.’ This may be true, but the extent of the bias need not be the same, and importantly, the nature of the bias matters too, as the consequences for society might be radically different.”

Give the entire piece a read. It helps illuminate dis coarse discourse.

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All That Was Old Is New Again 0

David discusses how the pandemic paranoia is being harnessed to fuel anti-semitism. (Warning: Short commercial at the end.)

Here’s the link to the MIT report David refers to.

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Freedom of Screech 0

Spocko wonders why bullies not only pay no price for bullying, but are, indeed, actively rewarded. A snippet (emphasis in the original):

When people show up with guns at school board member’s house they aren’t there using their 1st Amendment rights. it’s not a conversation about an issue. It’s a threat.

(snip)

The media never want to be seen as being against people’s speech. But threatening speech is not protected speech. When I use that phrase, it starts questions of definitions. What is the definition of a threat? What is “true threat”? What is actionable by law enforcement? What was the intent?

The justice system is slow. Social media & TV news is fast. When the media run threat stories, they usually can’t show any immediate legal consequences to the ones making the threats. Occasionally they can show people getting fired. Or kicked off social media. But often there are no negative consequences at all.

People are rewarded for their violent rhetoric with likes and shares. In some cases it leads to donations, electoral votes and political power.

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Facebook Frolics 0

Frolickers fomenting falsehoods.

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Still Rising Again after All These Years 0

Charles M. Blow points to what’s happening in Texas and warns of the threat of Jim Crow Redux. Here’s a bit of his article;

According to an analysis by The Texas Tribune, although white Texans are only about 40% of the state’s population, “In the initial map for the Texas House, the majority of eligible voters (known in the redistricting and census data as the Citizen Voting Age Population) in 59.3% of the districts are white.”

Furthermore, according to The Tribune, “In the proposed Senate map, 64.5% of the districts have white majorities,” and “white Texans make up the majority of eligible voters in 60.5% of the proposed congressional districts.”

How else to describe this other than racist gerrymandering? This is an attempt to lock in white dominance and control even after white people no longer have a numerical advantage.

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True Believers 0

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Public Healthiness 0

At NJ.com, Clifford Kulwin reports on his visit to a polity where the pandemic did not become politicized. A snippet:

No one enjoys wearing masks, of course, but they weren’t a source of conflict. No slipping it under the nose, no arguing with a museum guard or a flight attendant, no articles in the newspaper about groups or individuals challenging government public health edicts. Everybody followed the rules.

Shortly after my arrival, a friend emailed,“ do you feel safe there?” I answered honestly. “Safer than I do at home.”

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Twits on Twitter 0

A meme girl twit.

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All the History that Fits 0

Via C&L, which has commentary.

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Maskless Marauders 0

At the Hartford Courant, Kevin Rennie points out that words matter.

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The Monster Next Door 0

I have resisted the temptation of join NextDoor. I had a sneaking feeling that it could lead to no good, because years of experience and observation have taught me that “social” media isn’t.

As evidence, I offer one person’s story.

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The Bullies’ Pulpit 0

Frame One:  Schoolboy says,

Via The Bob Cesca Show Blog.

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Metrics 0

Mark Zuckerberg smilingly points at a graph showing profits soaring.  In the background, three other graphs show soaring rates of hate, violence, and misinformation.

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It Was All about the Benjamins 0

Dartmouth professor Randall Balmer tells the story of the rise of the “religious right.” It’s not what you might think, and certainly not the stories they tell themselves. A nugget:

What really happened? According to Paul Weyrich, conservative activist and architect of the religious right, the movement started in the 1970s in response to attempts on the part of the Internal Revenue Service to rescind the tax-exempt status of whites-only segregation academies (many of them church sponsored) and Bob Jones University because of its segregationist policies.

Follow the link for the rest.

Aside:

Many years ago, I visited Bob Jones U. while researching a paper I was working on for some class I forget which one but most likely a sociology class my senior year.

It was one of the spookiest places I have ever seen.

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Easy Marks 0

The editorial board of the Las Vegas Sun is somewhat taken aback by Republicans’ willingness to believe anything. Here’s a bit:

New Hampshire state Rep. Ken Weyler was so convinced about the accuracy of a new report on the COVID-19 vaccine that the 79-year-old Republican felt compelled to circulate it among his colleagues recently.

Imagine his fellow legislators’ surprise in learning the findings of the report, including that the vaccine contains a “living organism with tentacles” and is causing the babies of vaccinated parents to be born “transhuman” with “pitch-black eyes.”

Amazing. And, of course, completely insane.

Follow the link for a litany of lunacy.

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Devolution 0

The stupid.

It metastasizes.

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“An Armed Society Is a Polite Society,” Vaccine Nation Dept. 0

Brotherly politeness.

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