From Pine View Farm

Mammon category archive

Their Unfair Share 0

Sportswriter extraordinaire Bob Molinaro:

A pithy Twitter commentary from former CBS news anchor Dan Rather on the vanity space launches of billionaires Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson: “The space race of the 1960s was fueled by American tax payers. This space race is fueled by non-tax payers.”

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McConnell’s Motivator 0

Mitch McConnell, backed by Fox News, points towards a bull holding a box of Kleenex and fronted by body bags tagged

Via The Bob Cesca Show Blog.

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Who Funds the Voter Fraud Fraudsters? 0

Corporations who profess to protest the voter fraud fraud, among others.

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A Money Pit 0

PoliticalProf.

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Counter-Factual 0

Will Bunch notes that it has been 52 years since Americans landed on the moon–a feat made possible by science, Science, after all, is the pursuit of fact. He considers why so many Americans now reject science (think vaccines, for example). A nugget (emphasis added):

Less than a year after Apollo 11 came the first Earth Day — scientists warning that industrial progress threatened environmental destruction — and also the massacre at Kent State, amid a backlash of the so-called “silent majority” against what was happening on college campuses where many researchers are employed. Just like the lunar module, distrust in modern science was engineered by humans — billionaire industrialists who funded pro-fossil-fuel think tanks, and right-wing talk radio and later cable TV ratings seekers who mocked effete “tree huggers.”

Indeed, wealthy capitalists and the politicians who aided the backlash and rode it to victories — Richard Nixon, Spiro Agnew, Ronald Reagan — were so successful that distrust in science and the conspiracy theories that flow from that distrust now spread as virally as COVID-19 itself, among everyday folks on social media sites like Facebook. Albeit with an occasional booster shot from the most cynical media celebrities like Fox’s Tucker Carlson.

I commend his article to your attention.

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Space Invaders 0

David Zurawik is not impressed by rich guys getting high or by the media coverage thereof. He seems to think that it is conspicuous consumption write large. A snippet:

I was already tired of the gee-whiz coverage of Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos going into space before Branson actually went there Sunday (or, went somewhere close, depending on your definition of space).

But much of the coverage since has absolutely worn me out with its treatment of Branson as a heroic figure and his joy ride some 50 miles above earth as if it was a monumental moment in human exploration and consciousness.

Follow the link for the rest.

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Facebook Frolics 0

Antitrustworthy frolics.

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The Rich Are Different from You and Me, Reprise 0

Homeless man sleeping on park bench covered by newspaper with headline,

Click for the original image.

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The Rich Are Different from You and Me 0

They get to indulge their fantasies.

Caption:  The space between us.  Image:  Jeff Bezos, wallowing in money, in a space capsule labeled

Click to view the original image.

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Fringe with Benefits 0

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Payday 0

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette takes a long look at whether unemployment benefits keep persons from applying for jobs. In a lengthy article, they explores the pros and cons of the issue. Given all the shouting, the piece is worth a read. Here’s a bit:

What she (Rachel Deutsch, who runs a support group for restaurant workers–ed.)r hasn’t heard is that the extra $300 tacked on to each unemployment check is keeping people from looking for work.

“I have not heard a single person in our group say, ‘These benefits are great, I’m going to stay at home,’” said Ms. Deutsch, who also is the director of worker justice campaigns at the Center for Popular Democracy, a progressive advocacy organization based in New York. “They don’t want to experience the shame of being unemployed. They know that even under the best-case scenario, these benefits will not last forever.”

Afterthought:

I doubt seriously that many persons would choose unemployment benefits over gainful employment and suspect that those who do are likely battling other issues, such as drugs or alcohol or personal issues or lack of means of transportation to and from work.

The key phrase, of course, is “gainful employment.”

I believe that what underlies the claims by employers that persons willingly choose unemployment benefits, which are meager at best, is that employers would rather pay meager wages than living ones. So they point their fingers elsewhere to take attention away from the starvation wages they are offering.

But that’s just me.

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A Taxing Issue 0

At the Washington Monthly, Jennifer Taub takes a deep dive into the tax fraud charges against Alan Weisselberg and, by implication, Donald Trump’s “business” ventures.

It’s long, complex, and boring, and a very worthwhile read.

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Hoarders 0

Thom and his guest discuss the “morbidly wealthy” and their dynastic desires.

“Morbidly weathy.” What a well-turned phrase.

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Public Good Private Greed 0

Shorter Will Bunch: Them what has, keeps.

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“Money To Burn” 0

Image:  Jeff Bezos flying through space in a paper airplane made of money.  Caption:  Money to burn. Not a nickel for taxes.

Click to view the original image.

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The Privatization Scam, Lovely Rita Dept. 0

Meter made.

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Facebook Frolics 0

False flag frolics.

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“The Arc of Deductibles” 0

Thom talks with Wendell Potter about the current state of health insurance.

Visit Wendell Potter’s Center for Health and Democracy.

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It’s Not the Labor that’s Short. It’s the Paychecks. 0

At the Des Moines Register, Maria Reppas remembers her time working in a restaurant and makes the case that small business owners (such as restaurants) are grousing about the wrong shortage. A snippet (emphasis added):

When I hear about the “labor shortage” in the restaurant industry, I look at the pay. The federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 an hour, and for tipped servers it’s $2.13 an hour. Despite increased costs of living, those rates haven’t changed since 2009 and 1991, respectively. . . .

Instead of a mythical labor shortage, the United States has a livable wage shortage.

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Facebook Frolics 0

iPhone Phrolics.

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