From Pine View Farm

Political Theatre category archive

A Tune for the Times 0

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It’s Bubblelicious, The Origins Issue 0

Thom looks back at the inception of the right-wing think tank bubble.

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Twits on Twitter 0

Twits before the (Bill) Barr.

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Dis Coarse Discourse 0

At Psychology Today Blogs, Daniel A. Lobel offers some hints on how to communicate with Trump supporters.

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The Tattletale 0

Words fail me.

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The Noaccount Recount 0

At AZcentral, an Arizona Republican whose on the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors calls out his party for forsaking truth in favor of Donald Trump’s “Big Lie.” Here’s a bit of his article (emphasis added):

I can say with confidence the election was safe, secure and fair.

There was no foul play.

There was no vote switching.

The November election was one of the best we’ve ever run.

For certifying and then defending the results of the 2020 general election, I’ve been sued, subpoenaed and chastised, primarily by Republicans. For embracing reality, I’ve had my conservative credentials questioned and even my integrity challenged.

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Allaying America’s Amnesia 0

At The Roanoke Times, John Freivalds looks back on some oft overlooked dates in American history.

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It’s All about the Eyeballs 0

Voice from television says,

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Nick Carraway puts his finger on a big part of the problem (and on part of the reason I gave up on television news a long, long time ago). A snippet (emphasis added):

Instead of educating, the radio and television networks have chosen to incite. Of course, this is not universally true. There are people that give terrific background on key issues that could educate the public. The problem is that even with those few people, the education is used as a tool to persuade. It is a powerful tool and an effective tool, but it is still a tool at the end of the day.

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Dis Coarse Discourse 0

Two men standing outside of

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True Believers 0

Frames One and Two:  Tearful Republican Elephant says,

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All the News that Fits 0

Trudy Ruben is concerned about the bubbleliciousness. Here’s a bit of her article:

We are not (yet) in a “1984” era, to cite the famous George Orwell novel about a totalitarian society whose members are taught that “freedom is slavery” and “ignorance is strength.” The press is still free to report the facts, but an important segment of the media, especially on TV, radio and the internet, have chosen to use that freedom to promote an endless stream of falsehoods about public health and political issues.

Follow the link for the rest.

Along the same lines, Tony Norman argues that truth has no place in today’s Republican Party. (Again, much more at the link.)

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The Divorcee 0

Couple walking by man wearing Q tee-shirt who is yelling,

Via Juanita Jean.

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All the News that Fits 0

Man watching TV News.  Audio says,

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At Psychology Today Blogs, Sophia Moskalenko identifies four factors which she believes encourage the spread of “fake news” (also known in some circles as “lies”). Here’s her list; follow the link for a detailed discussion of each one.

My research led me to the discovery that, with QAnon’s conspiracy theories, as much as with other fake news, four forces advance it toward becoming viral and radicalizing mass publics. These four horsemen of fake news are:

      1. True lies
      2. Mythmakers
      3. Heralds
      4. Mass emotions

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The Abstainer 0

Liz Cheney, speaking to Steve Scalise, Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, etc., all of whom are holding glasses filled with a red liquid, says,

Via Job’s Anger.

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The Quest 0

Title:  The Search for Voter Fraud Continues.  Image:  A van labeled

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“Facts Are What People Think” 0

Writing at Psychology Today Blogs, Glenn Geher discusses what happens when politics collides with objective face, that is, with science. A snippet (emphasis added):

At its core, the goal of science is to, blindly and fairly, help us understand the world through carefully implemented data collection and statistical processes.

On the other hand, political behavior is all about how certain narratives and decisions are endorsed because they ultimately advance the goals of some select individual or groups of individuals. The second that politics enters the world of science, we have a problem on our hands.

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Dis Coarse Discourse 0

Two Republican Elephants in front of White House.  One says to the other,

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Aside:

“Social” media isn’t.

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A Tune for the Times 0

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True Believers 0

Republican Elephant holding a sign reading

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Vaccine Nation 0

The person in question has defended himself by claiming that he was trying to educate his constituents. I tend to agree with Emma Vigeland’s point that “some questions are so illegitimate” that they don’t deserve to be asked, let along answered.

We are a society of stupid.

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